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Teacher representations of the successful use of computer-based tools and resources in secondary-school English, mathematics and science
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TATE Volume 20, Number 3, ISSN 0742-051X Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

This study investigated professional thinking about pedagogical aspects of technology use in mainstream classroom practice. It focuses on the systems of ideas which frame teacher accounts of the successful use of computer-based tools and resources in the core subjects of English, Mathematics and Science at secondary-school level. These accounts were elicited through group interviews with the relevant subject departments in six secondary schools in England. The analysis identifies seven broad themes in which teachers point to the contribution of technology use in: effecting working processes and improving production; supporting processes of checking, trialling and refinement; enhancing the variety and appeal of classroom activity; fostering pupil independence and peer support; overcoming pupil difficulties and building assurance; broadening reference and increasing currency of activity; and focusing on overarching issues and accentuating important features. Further examination of these themes shows how professional thinking about technology use is anchored in well-established representations of pupil motivation and classroom learning, and how contrasting subject profiles reflect corresponding differences in wider subject cultures.

Citation

Ruthven, K., Hennessy, S. & Brindley, S. (2004). Teacher representations of the successful use of computer-based tools and resources in secondary-school English, mathematics and science. Teaching and Teacher Education: An International Journal of Research and Studies, 20(3), 259-275. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved June 19, 2021 from .

This record was imported from Teaching and Teacher Education: An International Journal of Research and Studies on January 28, 2019. Teaching and Teacher Education: An International Journal of Research and Studies is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2004.02.002

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