You are here:

Understanding the relationship between levels of mobile technology use in high school physics classrooms and the learning outcome
ARTICLE

, , ,

British Journal of Educational Technology Volume 50, Number 2, ISSN 0007-1013 e-ISSN 0007-1013 Publisher: Wiley

Abstract

Mobile technology has been increasingly adopted in science education. We generally assume that more innovative use of mobile technology leads to a greater learning outcome. Yet, there is a lack of empirical research to support this assumption. To fill in the gap, we drew upon data from 803 high school students who had used mobile devices for five months in physics classrooms. Using the SAMR model (ie, Substitution, Augmentation, Modification, and Redefinition), we distinguished their uses into two levels: Substitution (replacing traditional instructional approach with mobile technology without functional improvement), and augmentation (enhancing instruction with affordances provided by mobile technology). Using Hierarchical Linear Modeling analysis, we found that the augmentation level of use was positively correlated with the physics learning outcome, but the substitution level of use was not. We further identified four sub‐types of uses within the augmentation level. We found that after‐school remediating activities and student–teacher displaying activities were positively correlated with student physics achievement, but teacher‐assigned activities had no significant correlation and learning aid activities had a negative correlation with the learning outcome. This study provided empirical evidence to support the assumption that a higher level of mobile technology use may be related to a greater learning outcome and that the impact of mobile technology may be determined by multiple factors such as who initiates the use and whether the use enhances or distracts students' knowledge construction.

Citation

Zhai, X., Zhang, M., Li, M. & Zhang, X. (2019). Understanding the relationship between levels of mobile technology use in high school physics classrooms and the learning outcome. British Journal of Educational Technology, 50(2), 750-766. Wiley. Retrieved December 2, 2021 from .