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Evaluating Financial Literacy Curriculum for Young Adults with Special Needs: A Review of Content, Universal Design for Learning, and Culturally Responsive Curriculum Principles
ARTICLE

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Citizenship, Social and Economics Education Volume 17, Number 2,

Abstract

Acquiring financial literacy presents many unique challenges for young adults with disabilities. Although financial literacy can and should be taught throughout the lifespan, this review examines the curriculum accessible to students with high incidence disabilities who are 14-21 years old, when they are planning for transition from secondary school to the workforce/higher education. This review examines five examples of promising financial literacy curriculum: "Financial Fitness for Life," "Practical Money Skills," "Finance in the Classroom," "Money Talks 4 Teens," and "Money Smart for Young Adults." The curricula are compared for their application of universal design and culturally responsive curriculum principles. Completed rubrics will be presented to evaluate those curricula based on standards-based financial literacy concepts particularly relevant to youth with special needs, principles of universal design, and culturally responsive curriculum.

Citation

Henning, M.B. & Johnston-Rodriguez, S. (2018). Evaluating Financial Literacy Curriculum for Young Adults with Special Needs: A Review of Content, Universal Design for Learning, and Culturally Responsive Curriculum Principles. Citizenship, Social and Economics Education, 17(2), 118-135. Retrieved January 28, 2022 from .

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