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Implementing Web-Based Scientific Inquiry in Preservice Science Methods Courses
Article

, Lehigh University, United States

CITE Journal Volume 5, Number 1, ISSN 1528-5804 Publisher: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education, Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

This paper describes how the Web-based Inquiry for Learning Science (WBI) instrument was used with preservice elementary and secondary science teachers in science methods courses to enhance their understanding of Web-based scientific inquiry. The WBI instrument is designed to help teachers identify Web-based inquiry activities for learning science and classify those activities along a continuum from learner directed to materials directed for each of the five essential features of inquiry, as described in Inquiry and the National Science Education Standards (National Research Council, 2000). Implementations of WBI analysis activities in preservice science methods courses are discussed.

Citation

Bodzin, A.M. (2005). Implementing Web-Based Scientific Inquiry in Preservice Science Methods Courses. Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education, 5(1), 50-65. Waynesville, NC USA: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education. Retrieved March 21, 2019 from .

Keywords

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References

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Cited By

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    Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education Vol. 10, No. 4 (December 2010) pp. 411–431

  2. Guest Editorial: Technology Proficiencies in Science Teacher Education

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