You are here:

Course Management Systems as Tools for the Creation of Online Learning Environments:Evaluation from a Social Constructivist Perspective and Implications for their Design
Article

, University of Thessaly, Greece

International Journal on E-Learning Volume 5, Number 4, ISSN 1537-2456 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

The Internet and the Web offer academic institutions solutions for covering the massive demand for education and transition towards student-centered, social constructivist educational models, in accordance with the demands of the knowledge-based society. This article reports on an investigation aimed at presenting a synthesis of recent research on the applications of Course Management Systems (CMS) in academic institutions, and evaluating the research directions and findings from a social constructivist perspective. The investigation explored current uses of CMS in academia, the impact of CMS on the educational processes, faculty and students, the differences among various modes of CMS-based online learning, and the extent to which CMS support social constructivist approaches to learning. It was found that CMS are currently used in a variety of disciplines for oncampus, mixed-mode, and complete online courses, yielding positive student attitudes and enabling faculty to create online learning environments of social constructivist inspiration. However, creating such environments by means of CMS still poses significant workload on faculty for structuring online interactions, and monitoring and supporting students. Furthermore, the facilities currently offered by CMS still refrain from effectively supporting alternative forms of assessment and collaborative knowledge building activities. Implications for the design of CMS are considered.

Citation

Papastergiou, M. (2006). Course Management Systems as Tools for the Creation of Online Learning Environments:Evaluation from a Social Constructivist Perspective and Implications for their Design. International Journal on E-Learning, 5(4), 593-622. Waynesville, NC USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved April 20, 2019 from .

Keywords

View References & Citations Map

References

These references have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake in the references above, please contact info@learntechlib.org.

View References & Citations Map

Cited By

  1. Reaching Out to Remote Places: A Discussion of Technology and The Future of Distance Education in Rural America

    Xi Chen & Andrew Koricich, Texas Tech University, United States

    E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2014 (Oct 27, 2014) pp. 370–376

  2. Comparison of Face-To-Face and Hybrid Delivery of a Course that Requires Technology Skills Development

    Gary J. Senn, University of South Carolina Aiken, United States

    Journal of Information Technology Education: Research Vol. 7, No. 1 (Jan 01, 2008) pp. 267–283

  3. Addressing diverse learner preferences and intelligences with emerging technologies: Matching models to online opportunities

    Ke Zhang, Wayne State University; Curtis J. Bonk, Indiana University

    Canadian Journal of Learning and Technology / La revue canadienne de l’apprentissage et de la technologie Vol. 34, No. 2 (Mar 25, 2009)

  4. Evaluating the Motivational Aspects of a Web-based Learning Environment for the Teaching of Middle School Geometry

    Emmanouil Choustoulakis & Emmanouil Nikoloudakis, National & Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece

    Global Learn 2011 (Mar 28, 2011) pp. 803–808

These links are based on references which have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake, please contact info@learntechlib.org.