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Some Thoughts About Applying Constructivist Theories of Learning to Guide Instruction
PROCEEDINGS

, University of Washington

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

This paper addresses two issues: the basic assumptions and characteristics of constructivist theories of learning (CTL), and the circumstances under which it is appropriate or inappropriate to apply them to guide instruction. Constructivist theories of learning grew from cognitive theories which have roots in objectivism, but they reject the objectivist tradition. Objectivism is the philosophical source of behaviorism and most cognitive theories that have guided most educational practice (Winn, 1990; Duffy & Jonassen, 1991). In order to answer questions that may arise around those issues, it is necessary to clarify the differences between objectivism and constructivism. Also, it is necessary to understand the differences among various schools of CTL before drawing on any of them to guide instruction. Objectivism as the Target of the

Citation

Feng, Y. (1995). Some Thoughts About Applying Constructivist Theories of Learning to Guide Instruction. In J. Willis, B. Robin & D. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 1995--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 816-819). Chesapeake, VA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved December 15, 2019 from .

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