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Unleashing the Potential: Learner and Educator Attitudes Towards Computer Technology Use
PROCEEDINGS

, , Concordia University, Canada

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Montréal, Quebec, Canada ISBN 978-1-880094-98-3 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), San Diego, CA

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to examine adult learners’ and educators’ use of computer technology for language learning. Adult learner participants in this study consisted of students enrolled in courses at language learning institutions. Adult educator participants in this study consisted of instructors at language learning institutions. Results from the Learner Questionnaire and the Educator Questionnaire indicate that both adult learners and adult educators demonstrate positive attitudes towards the use of computer technology for language learning in a face-to-face classroom context. This study addresses the following research question: What are the attitudes of adult learners and educators towards the use of computer technology for language learning?

Citation

Corona, S. & Kavousi, S. (2012). Unleashing the Potential: Learner and Educator Attitudes Towards Computer Technology Use. In T. Bastiaens & G. Marks (Eds.), Proceedings of E-Learn 2012--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 1 (pp. 937-940). Montréal, Quebec, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved March 21, 2019 from .

Keywords

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