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Designing and Creating Engaging, Exciting and Effective e-Learning
PROCEEDINGS

, Fort Hays State University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Nashville, Tennessee, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-84-6 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Abstract: This brief paper introduces an online training project developed at Fort Hays State University in the United States. After a brief literature review on the differences between face-to-face teaching and online instruction to show the importance of preparing effective online instructors, the author also describes the existing faculty resources at the university and a recent online faculty survey that helped the Center for Teaching Excellence and Learning Technologies (CTELT) to define the support needs for creating online training modules to train faculty in online course design and delivery. The training module outline has been introduced and the data related to the training modules will be presented and shared at the SITE conference.

Citation

Wang, H. (2011). Designing and Creating Engaging, Exciting and Effective e-Learning. In M. Koehler & P. Mishra (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2011--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 802-804). Nashville, Tennessee, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved March 21, 2019 from .

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References

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