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Expanding the possibilities of discussion: A critical approach to the use of online discussion boards in the English classroom
ARTICLE

, Longwood University, United States

CITE Journal Volume 11, Number 4, ISSN 1528-5804 Publisher: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education, Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

This paper focused on whether the use of online discussion boards can enhance the quality of interaction in the middle and high school English classroom, covering both the characteristics of online discussion boards and potential negative effects of their features. The features of online discussion boards, their effects, and how these boards relate to the forms of communication facilitated by Web 2.0 technologies are discussed, and recommendations are provided for using online discussion boards in the English classroom.

Citation

Ruday, S. (2011). Expanding the possibilities of discussion: A critical approach to the use of online discussion boards in the English classroom. Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education, 11(4), 350-361. Waynesville, NC USA: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education. Retrieved March 19, 2019 from .

Keywords

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Cited By

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    Kevin Oliver, North Carolina State University, United States; Michael Cook, Clemson University, United States; Ruie Pritchard & Sara Lee, North Carolina State University, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2014 (Mar 17, 2014) pp. 1128–1134

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