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Factors Disturbing Online Discussion in a System that Supports Simulation for Professional Skills Education
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, Hokusei Gakuen University, Japan ; , Musashino Art University, Japan ; , Nagoya University, Japan

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Toronto, Canada ISBN 978-1-880094-81-5 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

Simulation is an effective method used in classroom settings to teach professional skills. Feedback from others and self-reflection are useful, as is online interaction. The authors developed a system called STICS to support simulations in classroom settings using video clips and comments. This paper describes an exploratory investigation to examine the possibility of asynchronous discussion on STICS. The authors focus on the rare interactions among students in the discussion and analyze students’ questionnaires and interview transcripts. As a result, the authors found four factors that deter students from posting their comments: avoiding repetition, students’ self-restraint for the fear of posting inadequate comments, the interface of the system, and the design of the experiment. On the other hand, anonymity and attaching titles could help to facilitate students’ comment writing. In order to use STICS as a tool for online asynchronous discussion, it is important to understand and consider these factors consciously.

Citation

Kaneko, D., Arakawa, A. & Sugawara, I. (2010). Factors Disturbing Online Discussion in a System that Supports Simulation for Professional Skills Education. In J. Herrington & C. Montgomerie (Eds.), Proceedings of ED-MEDIA 2010--World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications (pp. 1514-1519). Toronto, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved March 27, 2019 from .

Keywords

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