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The More the World Changes the More the Education System Remains the Same: Addressing the Need to Use Emerging Technologies to Enhance Online Learning Communities
PROCEEDINGS

, University of Ottawa, Canada

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Las Vegas, Nevada, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-64-8 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Today, many higher and continuing education learners are either busy working adults who have full-time jobs and family responsibilities or young high school graduates who arrive on campus as "digital natives" accustomed to using technology for learning and socializing. These learners' want, need, and/or expect the flexibility, convenience, interactivity, animation, and "frills" afforded by the use of technology in their courses and programs. Emerging technologies have the potential to enhance eLearning by facilitating the development of online learning communities. This paper presents the findings of an investigation exploring how emerging technologies were used to develop and facilitate learning communities in university and continuing education courses. The Demand Driven Learning Model (DDLM) was used to guide the evaluation that examined the process and outcomes of the courses, understand the learners' experiences, and identify lessons learned to guide future eLearning initiatives.

Citation

MacDonald, C. (2008). The More the World Changes the More the Education System Remains the Same: Addressing the Need to Use Emerging Technologies to Enhance Online Learning Communities. In K. McFerrin, R. Weber, R. Carlsen & D. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2008--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 3047-3054). Las Vegas, Nevada, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved October 17, 2019 from .

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