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Can a mobile technology become a viable literacy education option for underserved illiterate indigenous children in Latin America?
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, Stanford University, United States ; , Ellis Elementary, Colombia ; , UNESCO, Peru

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Vancouver, Canada ISBN 978-1-880094-62-4 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

Literacy is a human right unequally distributed among the world's population. Despite global efforts to fight illiteracy, high illiteracy rates continue to jeopardize access for many to basic schooling, life-long learning, health, and environment safety. Illiteracy also hinders the economic prosperity of the poorest societies in this digital age. This paper focuses on indigenous children in Latin America and explores emerging opportunities to use mobile language learning devices to develop literacy skills. It also discusses a situation and culture-specific design consideration to meet the learning needs of this marginalized population.

Citation

Kim, P., Olaciregui, C. & Miranda, T. (2007). Can a mobile technology become a viable literacy education option for underserved illiterate indigenous children in Latin America?. In C. Montgomerie & J. Seale (Eds.), Proceedings of ED-MEDIA 2007--World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications (pp. 1056-1065). Vancouver, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved February 23, 2019 from .

Keywords

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