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Learning by Communicating Concepts Through Comics
PROCEEDINGS

, , , University of Victoria, Canada

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in San Antonio, Texas, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-61-7 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Comics are a part of popular culture that simultaneously appeals to children and raises the eyebrows of parents and educators. Comics were enthusiastically examined for educational potential in the 1940s but were subsequently denigrated and effectively blacklisted in the 1950s. They were restored as a mainstream literary genre in the 1990s yet their educational potential has only recently recovered as a topic of interest to researchers. Having students create their own comics can improve motivation, literacy and conceptual understanding. New comic authoring programs allow students to experience the benefits of authoring meaningful, satisfying comics without the angst and frustration often associated with creating traditional comics or the overwhelming wordsmithing load imposed by traditional written reports. Having preservice teachers create comics helps them to explore the learning potential of a creative medium that is consistent with a hands-on, constructivist philosophy.

Citation

Francis Pelton, L., Pelton, T. & Moore, K. (2007). Learning by Communicating Concepts Through Comics. In R. Carlsen, K. McFerrin, J. Price, R. Weber & D. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2007--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 1974-1981). San Antonio, Texas, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved November 17, 2019 from .

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