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Technology facilitator as technology leader: Exhibiting key educational leadership characteristics
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, , East Carolina University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in San Antonio, Texas, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-61-7 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

In our study, we proposed that a technology facilitator possesses and exhibits a range of educational leadership skills. To document this phenomenon, we identified a list of leadership characteristics after a comprehensive review of relevant literature. During several “shadowing” sessions, we concluded that our observed technology facilitator did exhibit the aforementioned specific technology leadership characteristics on multiple occasions and is indeed a technology leader. We intend to comprehensively describe and illustrate all of the technology's observed leadership characteristics during our presentation. The implications of our study are two-fold. First, the perception of a technology facilitator needs to be shifted at schools to reflect a set of additional leadership characteristics. Academic programs that train technology facilitators must also respond to this additional set of leadership skills by completing a comprehensive review of their curriculum to ensure the development of these leadership characteristics.

Citation

Sugar, W. & Holloman, H. (2007). Technology facilitator as technology leader: Exhibiting key educational leadership characteristics. In R. Carlsen, K. McFerrin, J. Price, R. Weber & D. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2007--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 1898-1901). San Antonio, Texas, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved February 23, 2019 from .

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