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What really matters for faculty to develop and implement hybrid/blended courses?
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, , , Dowling College, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in San Antonio, Texas, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-61-7 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

This study identifies factors that influence the adoption of hybrid courses by 128 faculty in Private colleges and universities in New York. Four factors were included: technology, pedagogy, institutional policies, and faculty-centered issues. We found all have a degree of influence on faculty members' decisions to develop and implement hybrid courses. The major items of influence were technology (reliability of technology, technical support, hardware/software availability, and connectivity issues were higher than 70% influential), pedagogy (nature of course content and course objectives were higher than 65%), faculty-centered issues (control of curriculum were higher than 60%), and finally, Institutional policy, were “my institution provides technical support for computer equipment used in hybrid course” ranged higher than 60% of influence. The Less influential were the faculty-centered issues, with a lowest in promotion and tenure item (only 23% of level of influence).

Citation

Morote, E.S., Wittmann, H. & Kelly, T. (2007). What really matters for faculty to develop and implement hybrid/blended courses?. In R. Carlsen, K. McFerrin, J. Price, R. Weber & D. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2007--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 1085-1089). San Antonio, Texas, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved April 20, 2019 from .

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