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Seven Principles for Good Practice and Effective Online Instruction in Higher Education
PROCEEDINGS

, University of San Francisco, United States

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Honolulu, Hawaii, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-60-0 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), San Diego, CA

Abstract

This proposed study on which the roundtable will be based purports to investigate whether or not the effectiveness of online instruction reflects effective pedagogy. In particular, the study is designed to investigate the relationship among selected principles of good practice (Chickering & Gamson, 1987) and effectiveness of online instruction reported in a recent meta-analysis (Bernard et al., 2004) and a review of online instruction research (Tallent-Runnels et al., 2006). The questions addressed by the study are: To what extent is there a relationship between presence or absence of each of the seven principles and the effect size? To what extent is there a relationship between the number of seven principles present in the online study and the effect size? The discussion at the roundtable will focus on the results of the coding of the online studies for the seven principles and how and to what extent the seven principles are used in the online instruction.

Citation

Mukawa, T.E. (2006). Seven Principles for Good Practice and Effective Online Instruction in Higher Education. In T. Reeves & S. Yamashita (Eds.), Proceedings of E-Learn 2006--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 236-240). Honolulu, Hawaii, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved April 18, 2019 from .

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