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Creating an Online Helpdesk: Supporting Teaching and Learning
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, , Fort Hays State University, United States

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Orlando, FL USA ISBN 978-1-880094-60-0 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

Abstract: As online education is growing into mainstream in higher education, one of the challenges is how to enhance students' online learning experience. Both current research and theories such as the theory of transactional distance, seven principles for good practice in undergraduate education, and the adult learning theories indicate that interaction is very important in teaching and learning. In order to provide students good online learning experience and reduce faculty's teaching load, the Department of Leadership Studies at Fort Hays State University created an Online Helpdesk to increase interaction among students as well as between instructors and students. Discussion in this paper include an overview of the e-leadership program and the Online Helpdesk, a review of the related literature, the strategies used in the online program, and a conclusion.

Citation

Greenleaf, J. & Wang, H. (2006). Creating an Online Helpdesk: Supporting Teaching and Learning. In E. Pearson & P. Bohman (Eds.), Proceedings of ED-MEDIA 2006--World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications (pp. 274-281). Orlando, FL USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved March 19, 2019 from .

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References

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