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The Role of Epistemological Beliefs in Preservice Teachers’ Interpretation of Video Cases of Early-Grade Literacy Instruction
Article

, , Michigan State University, United States

Journal of Technology and Teacher Education Volume 15, Number 3, ISSN 1059-7069 Publisher: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education, Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

This study investigated how preservice teachers' beliefs about the nature of knowledge influence how they learn from, and interact with, a case-based hypermedia system designed to highlight exemplary elementary literacy instruction. Specifically, we examined if teacher preparation students' epistemological beliefs influenced what cases they selected, and how it further served as a lens in their reflective writing about their clip selections. The quantitative and qualitative analyses (case studies) focused on two epistemological beliefs-Fixed Ability and Simple Knowledge. The results illustrate that preservice teachers select video cases consistent with their prior epistemological beliefs, and their descriptions of what they find salient about those cases confirm their prior held beliefs. The findings from this study add to the theoretical literature and suggest future directions for research.

Citation

Yadav, A. & Koehler, M. (2007). The Role of Epistemological Beliefs in Preservice Teachers’ Interpretation of Video Cases of Early-Grade Literacy Instruction. Journal of Technology and Teacher Education, 15(3), 335-361. Waynesville, NC USA: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education. Retrieved March 19, 2019 from .

Keywords

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