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Web Inquiry Projects: A Paper Submitted as Part of the Symposium “Multimedia, Historical Inquiry and Preservice Teacher Education”
PROCEEDINGS

, San Diego State University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Phoenix, AZ, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-55-6 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

What will it take to better prepare social studies teachers to promote historical inquiry in their classrooms? Today's networked world affords us new opportunities to prepare teachers, but it will take more effort than simply pointing teachers to web sites full of wonderful primary source documents. Teachers simply have had too few experiences learning in inquiry-oriented ways, and as a result they know little of how to infuse inquiry into their future classrooms. The social studies methods course is perhaps our best and only opportunity to turn the tide of teacher misconceptions about inquiry learning and technology use. This paper describes how Web Inquiry Projects (WIPs), open inquiry learning activities that leverage the use of uninterpreted online data and information, are used in social studies methods courses at San Diego State University to prepare preservice teachers to implement historical inquiry as a legitimate alternative to traditional techniques of teaching history.

Citation

Molebash, P. (2005). Web Inquiry Projects: A Paper Submitted as Part of the Symposium “Multimedia, Historical Inquiry and Preservice Teacher Education”. In C. Crawford, R. Carlsen, I. Gibson, K. McFerrin, J. Price, R. Weber & D. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2005--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 3854-3855). Phoenix, AZ, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved July 17, 2019 from .

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