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Educators’ Professional Uses of Pinterest
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, , , Elon University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Savannah, GA, United States ISBN 978-1-939797-13-1 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

This paper presents emergent findings from an in-progress study on educators’ uses of Pinterest, a popular website and mobile app. The study is exploring how educators and educational organizations utilize Pinterest. Quantitative and qualitative data are being gathered and analyzed in order to describe patterns in use, and lay the groundwork for further research. In our sample, individual educators appeared to be more active Pinterest users than educational organizations during the data collection window. Some educators used Pinterest to promote educational resources they had created and offered for sale via sites such as TeachersPayTeachers.com. We discuss some of the apparent opportunities and challenges associated with educators’ professional uses of Pinterest.

Citation

Carpenter, J., Abrams, A. & Dunphy, M. (2016). Educators’ Professional Uses of Pinterest. In G. Chamblee & L. Langub (Eds.), Proceedings of Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 1925-1930). Savannah, GA, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved March 26, 2019 from .

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Cited By

  1. Twitter + Voxer: Educators’ Complementary Uses of Multiple Social Media

    Jeffrey Carpenter, Elon University, United States; Tim Green, California State University Fullerton, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2018 (Mar 26, 2018) pp. 2236–2244

  2. Exploring How and Why Educators Use Pinterest

    Jeffrey Carpenter, Amanda Cassaday & Stefania Monti, Elon University, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2018 (Mar 26, 2018) pp. 2222–2229

  3. Expanding Professional Learning Networks through an Institutional Twitter Hashtag

    Jeffrey Carpenter & Scott Morrison, Elon University, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2018 (Mar 26, 2018) pp. 2216–2221

  4. Advice Seeking and Giving in the Reddit r/Teachers Online Space

    Jeffrey Carpenter, Elon University, United States; Connor McDade, Alamance Burlington School System, United States; Samantha Childers, Elon University, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2018 (Mar 26, 2018) pp. 2207–2215

  5. Professionality, Preservice Teachers, and Twitter

    Miguel Gomez, Murray State University, United States; Wayne Journell, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, United States

    Journal of Technology and Teacher Education Vol. 25, No. 4 (October 2017) pp. 377–412

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