You are here:

Online Teacher Communities for Professional Learning
PROCEEDING

, The Pennsylvania State University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Savannah, GA, United States ISBN 978-1-939797-13-1 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Outside of traditional professional development such as in-services and workshops, teachers may search for other ways to improve teaching and learning. Online teacher communities such as Classroom 2.0, ProTeacher, and edutopia among others provide spaces for teachers to connect and learn about the profession. This paper presents the context for the potential of online teacher communities to become sources of professional learning. It also includes a list of fifteen online teacher communities and their basic attributes.

Citation

Tohill, K. (2016). Online Teacher Communities for Professional Learning. In G. Chamblee & L. Langub (Eds.), Proceedings of Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 981-986). Savannah, GA, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved March 20, 2019 from .

Keywords

View References & Citations Map

References

  1. Avalos, B. (2011). Teacher professional development in Teaching and Teacher Education over ten years. Teaching and Teacher Education, 27(1), 10-20.
  2. Brown, J.M. (2013). Professional development: The teacher’s perspective. (Doctoral dissertation). Retrieved from ProQuest Dissertations and Theses. (Accession Order No. 3572656)
  3. Bruckman, A. (2006). Learning in online communities. In R. Keith Sawyer (Ed.), The Cambridge handbook of the
  4. Fishman, B.J. & Davis, E.A. (2006). Teacher learning research and the learning sciences. In R. Keith Sawyer (Ed.), The Cambridge handbook of the learning sciences (535-550). New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.
  5. Garrison, R. & Akyol, Z. (2013). The community of inquiry theoretical framework. In M.G. Moore (Ed.), The handbook of distance education (104-119). New York, NY: Routledge.
  6. Holmes, A., MacLeod, A., & Signer, B. (2010). Professional development at a distance: A mixed-method study exploring inservice teachers’ views on presence online. Journal of Digital Learning in Teacher Education, 27(2), 76-85.
  7. Lieberman, A. & Mace, D.P. (2010). Making practice public: Teacher learning in the 21 st century. Journal of Teacher Education, 61(1-2), 77-88.
  8. Liu, K.Y. (2012). A design framework for online teacher professional development communities. AsiaPacific Education Review, 13, 701-711.
  9. Lock, J.V. (2006). A new image: Online communities to facilitate teacher professional development. Journal of Technology and Teacher Education, 14(4), 663-678.
  10. Postholm, M.B. (2012). Teachers’ professional development: a theoretical review. Educational Research, 54(4), 405-429.
  11. Trust, T. (2012). Professional learning networks designed for teacher learning. Journal of Digital Learning in Teacher Education, 28(4), 34-38.
  12. Vavasseur, C.B. & MacGregor, S.K. (2008). Extending content-focused professional development through online communities of practice. Journal of Research on Technology in Education, 40(4), 517-536.

These references have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake in the references above, please contact info@learntechlib.org.