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Program Theory Logic Model of Trace Effects Video Game
PROCEEDINGS

, University of South Alabama, United States

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in New Orleans, LA, USA ISBN 978-1-939797-12-4 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), San Diego, CA

Abstract

Which learning theories, models, or best practices are used to teach American culture and the English language in the Trace Effects video game? Logic modeling was used to explicate and evaluate the program theory embedded in the video game, supporting material, and stakeholders’ activities through questionnaires, interviews, observations, and secondary resources. The results indicated that the evaluand is based on the following major concepts: cognitivism, constructivism, the communicative approach to language acquisition, gaming as an instructional strategy, the Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages’ 2008 Technology Standards Framework, and the United States Department of State’s vision. A graphic logic model will be provided. This is an informal program theory evaluation of an educational video game conducted within the pragmatic-use-evaluation-branch paradigm of qualitative research. Permission was obtained from the U.S. Department of State to conduct the evaluation.

Citation

Rogers, S. (2014). Program Theory Logic Model of Trace Effects Video Game. In T. Bastiaens (Ed.), Proceedings of World Conference on E-Learning (pp. 1672-1684). New Orleans, LA, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved January 17, 2021 from .

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Cited By

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  • Exploring the Rules of the Game: Games in the Classroom, Game-Based Learning, Gamification, and Simulations

    Jana Willis, University of Houston-Clear Lake, United States; Spencer Greenhalgh, Michigan State University, United States; Larysa Nadolny, Iowa State University, United States; Sa Liu, University of Texas, United States; Tugce Aldemir, Penn State World Campus, United States; Sandra Rogers, University of South Alabama, United States; Monica Trevathan, Tietronix Software, United States; Susan Hopper, Pedagogical Balance of Effective Learning, United States; Wendy Oliver, Thrivist, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2017 (Mar 05, 2017) pp. 475–480

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