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Individual Differences and Learning Artifacts: A Case Study in Eighth Grade Geography
PROCEEDINGS

, The University of Memphis, United States ; , , The University of Georgia, United States

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Honolulu, Hawaii, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-48-8 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to explore how individual differences were used in the construction of computer mediated learning artifacts while working within a constructionist learning environment. A case study design was used with five participants purposively selected from an eighth grade geography class at a small, private day school in the southeastern United States. Data were collected through a self-report inventory, interviews, observations and artifacts. Results included that computer mediated learning artifacts reflected individual differences through blends of abilities and myriad levels of computer skills. Other abilities identified by the participants went untapped or unrecognized. Second, the learning artifacts represented the learners' knowledge in three ways: system knowledge, domain knowledge and metacognitive knowledge. Finally, the flexibility in the construction process allowed the participants to make decisions about their abilities, resources and plans.

Citation

Grant, M., Branch, R. & Hill, J. (2003). Individual Differences and Learning Artifacts: A Case Study in Eighth Grade Geography. In D. Lassner & C. McNaught (Eds.), Proceedings of ED-MEDIA 2003--World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications (pp. 2103-2110). Honolulu, Hawaii, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved December 15, 2019 from .

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