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Gender Differences in Technology Integration
PROCEEDINGS

, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Jacksonville, Florida, United States ISBN 978-1-939797-07-0 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Within social studies, researchers note limited attention has been given to examining gender differences as associated with technology integration. They call for increasing the dialogue regarding gender-related technology. In response, this study explores the gender divide in secondary teachers' perceptions of effective technology integration. Using a qualitative research design, this study provides insights into secondary social studies teachers' perceptions of their pedagogical practices and technology integration. The purpose of this study is to develop an in-depth understanding of high school teachers use of technology to teach and support student learning of social studies. Teacher interviews with twelve tech-savvy practioners provide a deep and rich view of content-specific technology usage as associated with teacher attributes and characteristics. Consideration of how technology is associated with gender-sensitive pedagogical thinking and practice may help unravel the aforementioned gap in technology usage in social studies. Patterns uncovered in data analysis suggest that gender plays a critical role in social studies technology integration.

Citation

Heafner, T. (2014). Gender Differences in Technology Integration. In M. Searson & M. Ochoa (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2014--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 2841-2851). Jacksonville, Florida, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved November 11, 2019 from .

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