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Pre-service Teacher Education in Game-Based Learning: Analyzing and Integrating Minecraft
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, , , , Drexel University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Jacksonville, Florida, United States ISBN 978-1-939797-07-0 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Pre-service teachers need the skills to identify the suitability of games and to employ games in curriculum development. We present a qualitative study in which one pre-service teacher analyzed and integrated Minecraft in a game-based learning lesson (GBL) plan for teaching English. This study is part of a mixed-methods project undertaken to educate fourteen pre-service teachers in game-based learning using the Game Network Analysis (GaNA) framework. An 11-weeks course prepared pre-service teachers in game analysis, game integration, and ecological conditions impacting game use in school contexts. We illustrate the use of GaNA by one pre-service teacher by describing the characteristics of Minecraft and subsequent learning activities created using the game for teaching English. A rubric based on GaNA facilitated the analysis and integration of Minecraft in a game-based learning lesson plan. Conclusions and implications are discussed for educating pre-service teachers in GBL using GaNA.

Citation

Shah, M., Foster, A., Scottoline, M. & Duvall, M. (2014). Pre-service Teacher Education in Game-Based Learning: Analyzing and Integrating Minecraft. In M. Searson & M. Ochoa (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2014--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 2646-2654). Jacksonville, Florida, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved March 22, 2019 from .

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Cited By

  1. Preparing Teachers for Integration of Digital Games in K-12 Education

    Mamta Shah & Aroutis Foster, Drexel University, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2016 (Mar 21, 2016) pp. 2349–2356

  2. Mining Knowledge with Game Based Learning: Building Knowledge Through Connected Learning with the use of Minecraft in the Classroom

    Jami Roberts-Woychesin, Arts & Technology Institute, United States; Yulia Piller, Arts & Technology Institue, United States

    Global Learn 2015 (April 2015) pp. 418–425

These links are based on references which have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake, please contact info@learntechlib.org.