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Video Self Modeling via iPods: The Road to Independent Task Completion
PROCEEDINGS

, Jefferson Public Schools, United States ; , University of Louisville, United States ; , Bellarmine University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Jacksonville, Florida, United States ISBN 978-1-939797-07-0 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

General and special education teachers can promote skill development, especially for children with autism in the general education classroom by using video self-modeling techniques. One skill area that is important in the general education classroom is independent task completion. Independent task completion is a challenge for many students with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This skill is especially important to develop independence with academic tasks in a socially acceptable and motivating way. The advantages of using video self-modeling includes with students with autism include being easily trained, portable, unobtrusive, and accepted by peers. Now there is a easy and efficient means of creating video self-modeling scenerios by using an iPod Touch ™. The iPod Touch™ promotes individualized instruction in an easily accessible format that can be generalized to a variety of environments, including the student’s home.

Citation

Bucalos, J., Bauder, D. & Bucalos, A. (2014). Video Self Modeling via iPods: The Road to Independent Task Completion. In M. Searson & M. Ochoa (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2014--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 2396-2401). Jacksonville, Florida, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved March 18, 2019 from .

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