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University Students and E-Learning: Are they really satisfied?
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, , , Robert Morris University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Jacksonville, Florida, United States ISBN 978-1-939797-07-0 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

This paper presents the results of a three-year study examining one university’s graduate and undergraduate students’ satisfaction with their experiences with online learning. Five hundred and fifty-three students participated in a series of surveys from May 2010 to February 2013. With some variation in the level of satisfaction, responses were consistent throughout the study. Students rated their experiences with both fully and partially online courses as moderately satisfactory. There were no statistically significant differences in the level of satisfaction based on gender, age, or level of study. Students’ experience with hybrid or partially online courses was only moderately better than their experience with fully online courses. Convenience was the most cited reason for satisfaction and lack of interaction was the most cited reason for dissatisfaction. There was also a definite preference for hybrid courses over fully online or partially online courses among those surveyed in th

Citation

Shelley, D., Cole, M. & Swartz, L. (2014). University Students and E-Learning: Are they really satisfied?. In M. Searson & M. Ochoa (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2014--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 2186-2195). Jacksonville, Florida, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved May 21, 2019 from .

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