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Using Student Response Systems to Collect Formative Data for Learning: An Evaluation of Professional Learning
PROCEEDINGS

, Kennesaw State University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Jacksonville, Florida, United States ISBN 978-1-939797-07-0 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

A school system in Georgia provided each middle school academic teacher with a student response system (SRS). This research addressed meeting the needs of the teachers as they implemented their new instructional tool. The Instructional Technology Specialist (ITS) designed professional learning that incorporated best practices for adult learners and use of the SRS as a formative assessment tool for learning. Fall survey data guided the professional development design and implementation and spring survey data helped the ITS evaluate and reflect upon professional practice. The quantitative results indicate that the sessions addressed adult learning principles and the supporting online resources were effective. These data suggest the need for further training on using the SRS to collect formative data during active teaching for guiding instruction. Research implications include the importance of needs assessment and evaluation for informing instructional design.

Citation

Fuller, J. (2014). Using Student Response Systems to Collect Formative Data for Learning: An Evaluation of Professional Learning. In M. Searson & M. Ochoa (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2014--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 739-746). Jacksonville, Florida, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved January 23, 2020 from .

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