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Using Universal Design to Minimize Accessibility Barriers in Distance Education
PROCEEDINGS

, University of Wyoming, United States

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Las Vegas, NV, USA ISBN 978-1-939797-05-6 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), San Diego, CA

Abstract

Although the ultimate goal of distance learning is to make education available to anyone, anywhere, anytime, this goal cannot be realized unless distance learning materials are designed to be accessible to all potential students, including those with mobility, visual, hearing, speech and learning disabilities. This paper examines the legal standards and guidelines established for the provision of accessibility to information technologies; addresses some of the barriers that need to be overcome such as online content formatting and faculty buy-in; and presents solutions such as planning, the incorporation of universal design principles, adoption of accessibility guidelines and standards, and training for faculty and staff.

Citation

Austill, L. (2013). Using Universal Design to Minimize Accessibility Barriers in Distance Education. In T. Bastiaens & G. Marks (Eds.), Proceedings of E-Learn 2013--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 1033-1040). Las Vegas, NV, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved December 11, 2019 from .

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