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The Features of Interactive Whiteboards and Their Influence on Learning
ARTICLE

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Learning, Media and Technology Volume 32, Number 3, ISSN 1743-9884

Abstract

In a small-scale study of Information and Communication Technology (ICT)-rich primary school, interactive whiteboards (IWBs) were found to be the predominant ICT tools used by teachers. The study sought to identify how the teachers used features of ICT to enhance learning, based on a list of ICT's functions published for teacher education programmes. This list did not appear to account for all the aspects of the IWB's influence that were described by teachers and observed in their lessons. Interview and observation data concerning digital whiteboard technology were probed further, using a framework for analysing activity settings designed for teaching and learning. This process generated a new taxonomy of features of ICT involving two levels: those intrinsic to digital media and devices and those constructed by hardware designers, software developers and teachers preparing resources for learning. Pedagogical actions supported by these features were identified and views concerning the impact of these actions on learning were analysed. This article reports the findings of the analysis, and exemplifies a use of the taxonomy in comparing practice across subjects. It suggests that this focus on ICT's features may be valuable for both future research on the impact of ICT on learning and the design of new ICT resources. (Contains 5 tables and 1 figure.)

Citation

Kennewell, S. & Beauchamp, G. (2007). The Features of Interactive Whiteboards and Their Influence on Learning. Learning, Media and Technology, 32(3), 227-241. Retrieved April 18, 2019 from .

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Cited By

  1. The Interactive Whiteboard: Uses, Benefits, and Challenges. A survey of 11,683 Students and 1,131 Teachers | Le tableau blanc interactif : usages, avantages et défis. Une enquête auprès de 11 683 élèves et 1131 enseignants

    Thierry Karsenti

    Canadian Journal of Learning and Technology / La revue canadienne de l’apprentissage et de la technologie Vol. 42, No. 5 (Dec 31, 2016)

  2. Secondary Mathematics Teachers’ Usage of Interactive Whiteboards: Three Digital Ways to Use this Instructional Tool

    Anne Marie S. Marshall, Berry College, United States

    E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2014 (Oct 27, 2014) pp. 1285–1292

  3. Teaching Maths in secondary schools using the IWB: How teacher’s knowledge of the affordance of IWB influence teaching practice

    Mohssen Hakami, Najran University, Saudi Arabia

    E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2014 (Oct 27, 2014) pp. 777–783

  4. [Chais] Teachers for "Smart Classrooms": The Extent of Implementation of an Interactive Whiteboard-based Professional Development Program on Elementary Teachers' Instructional Practices

    Ina Blau, Open University of Israel, Israel

    Interdisciplinary Journal of E-Learning and Learning Objects Vol. 7, No. 1 (Jan 01, 2011) pp. 275–289

  5. Novice Mathematics Teachers’ Use of Technology-Generated Representations

    Virginia Fraser, Indiana University Southeast, United States; Joe Garofalo, University of Virginia, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2011 (Mar 07, 2011) pp. 3984–3992

  6. Using Interactive Technologies to Promote Student Engagement and Learning in Mathematics

    Chia-Jung Chung, California State University, Sacramento, United States; William Storm, Davis Joint Unified School District, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2010 (Mar 29, 2010) pp. 3427–3431

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