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Technology in the Home and the Achievement of Young Children: Findings from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study
ARTICLE

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Early Education and Development Volume 17, Number 3, ISSN 1040-9289

Abstract

Because technology in the home is becoming ever more available, understanding the role of technology in early childhood development is increasingly an opportunity and a concern for educators. This report examines data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 1998-99, to provide an overview of the role of technology in the home and its impact on reading and math achievement in the early grades. The results show that access and use of technology influence children's academic achievement. Although the results show that having access to technology can contribute significantly to the achievement of young children, mere access is unlikely to be sufficient for all young children to benefit from technology in the home. Adults will need to mediate the use of these potential learning tools for children. Based on the findings of this report, policymakers should support increasing the availability of computers for low-income families and continue to discourage extensive viewing of TV, and researchers should focus on the specific methods that parents can enact to realize the learning potential of an increasingly ubiquitous resource: computers and the Internet in the home.

Citation

Espinosa, L.M., Laffey, J.M., Whittaker, T. & Sheng, Y. (2006). Technology in the Home and the Achievement of Young Children: Findings from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study. Early Education and Development, 17(3), 421-441. Retrieved November 15, 2019 from .

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