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Are Learning Styles Relevant to Virtual Reality?
ARTICLE

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Journal of Research on Technology in Education Volume 38, Number 2, ISSN 1539-1523

Abstract

This study aims to investigate the effects of a virtual reality (VR)-based learning environment on learners with different learning styles. The findings of the aptitude-by-treatment interaction study have shown that learners benefit most from the VR (guided exploration) mode, irrespective of their learning styles. This shows that the VR-based environment offers promise in accommodating individual differences in terms of learning style. In addition, the significant positive effect of the VR (guided exploration) mode–which provides additional navigational aids over the VR (non-guided exploration) mode–which does not provide additional navigational aids–also implies the importance of providing VR-based learning environments with proper instructional design to achieve the desired educational outcomes. (Contains 5 figures and 8 tables.)

Citation

Chen, C.J., Toh, S.C. & Ismail, W.M.F.W. (2005). Are Learning Styles Relevant to Virtual Reality?. Journal of Research on Technology in Education, 38(2), 123-141. Retrieved April 23, 2019 from .

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Cited By

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    Stan van Ginkel, VR Lab of the Archimedes Institute; Judith Gulikers, Harm Biemans & Omid Noroozi, Department of Education and Learning Sciences; Mila Roozen, Groningen Institute for Evolutionary Life Sciences; Tom Bos, NCOI Education Management; Richard van Tilborg & Melanie van Halteren, CoVince; Martin Mulder, Department of Education and Learning Sciences

    Computers & Education Vol. 134, No. 1 (June 2019) pp. 78–97

  2. Teaching for Success: Technology and Learning Styles in Preservice Teacher Education

    Pamela Solvie, Northwestern College, United States; Engin Sungur, University of Minnesota, Morris, United States

    Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education Vol. 12, No. 1 (March 2012) pp. 6–40

  3. The Relationship between Learning Styles and Student Learning in Online Courses

    Susan Featro, Wilkes University, United States

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2011 (Jun 27, 2011) pp. 3431–3438

  4. The Relationship Between Learning Styles and Student Learning in Online Courses

    Susan Featro, Wilkes University, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2011 (Mar 07, 2011) pp. 266–273

  5. Teaching for Success: Linking Technology and Learning Styles in Preservice Teacher Education

    Pamela Solvie & Lindsey Senske, University of Minnesota, Morris, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2009 (Mar 02, 2009) pp. 2681–2684

  6. Using Technology Tools to Engage Students with Multiple Learning Styles in a Constructivist Learning Environment

    Pamela Solvie & Molly Kloek, University of Minnesota Morris, United States

    Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education Vol. 7, No. 2 (June 2007) pp. 7–27

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