You are here:

Small Group and Individual Learning with Technology: A Meta-Analysis
ARTICLE

, ,

Review of Educational Research Volume 71, Number 3, ISSN 0034-6543

Abstract

Synthesized the empirical research on the effects of social context (small group versus individual learning) when students learn using computer technology. Analyzed 486 independent findings from 122 studies involving 11,317 learners. On average, small group learning had more positive effects, but findings on both individual achievement and group task performance were significantly heterogeneous. (SLD)

Citation

Lou, Y., Abrami, P.C. & d'Apollonia, S. (2001). Small Group and Individual Learning with Technology: A Meta-Analysis. Review of Educational Research, 71(3), 449-521. Retrieved February 22, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ERIC on April 18, 2013. [Original Record]

ERIC is sponsored by the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) of the U.S. Department of Education.

Copyright for this record is held by the content creator. For more details see ERIC's copyright policy.

Keywords

View References & Citations Map

Cited By

  1. Cognitive computing in education

    Mauro Coccoli, Paolo Maresca & Lidia Stanganelli

    Journal of e-Learning and Knowledge Society Vol. 12, No. 2 (May 21, 2016)

  2. The Effectiveness of Web-Based Instruction: An Initial Inquiry

    Tatana Olson & Robert Wisher

    The International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning Vol. 3, No. 2 (Oct 01, 2002)

  3. Evaluation of Instructor-Enhanced Computer Supported Collaborative Learning

    Irina Falls & Chiuchu (Melody) Chuang, University of North Carolina- Pembroke, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2011 (Mar 07, 2011) pp. 260–265

  4. Multimedia Case-based Instruction in Literacy: Pedagogy, Effectiveness, and Perceptions

    Elizabeth (Betsy) A. Baker, University of Missouri, United States

    Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia Vol. 18, No. 3 (July 2009) pp. 249–266

  5. The Effects of Ubiquitous Computing on Student Learning: A Systematic Review

    Edward C. Bethel, Robert M. Bernard, Philip C. Abrami & C. Anne Wade, Concordia University, Canada

    E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2007 (Oct 15, 2007) pp. 1987–1992

  6. Using Simulation, laboratory equipments and Conceptual Change Assignments to Enhance Learning of Simple Electricity

    Sami Nurmi & Tomi Jaakkola, Educational Technology Unit, University of Turku, Finland

    E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2006 (October 2006) pp. 2251–2257

  7. Online Study Groups: Comparison of Two Strategies

    Genevieve Johnson, Grant MacEwan College/Athabasca University, Canada; Julia Johnson, Laurentian University, Canada

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2005 (Jun 27, 2005) pp. 2025–2030

  8. Problem-Based Learning Online: Applications for Teacher Education

    Francis Harvey, Drexel University, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2003 (2003) pp. 362–365

  9. Factors Moderating Student Attitudes and Task Completion Time when Learning with Technology Individually or in Small Groups

    Yiping Lou, Louisiana State University, United States

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2003 (2003) pp. 1586–1587

  10. A FEEDBACK MODEL AND SUCCESSFUL E-LEARNING

    Steven Rosenfield, Vanier College & Concordia University, Canada; Yiping Lou, Louisiana State University, United States; Helena Dedic, Vanier College & Concordia University, Canada

    E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2002 (2002) pp. 1818–1821

These links are based on references which have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake, please contact info@learntechlib.org.