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Task Value Profiles across Subjects and Aspirations to Physical and IT-Related Sciences in the United States and Finland
ARTICLE

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Developmental Psychology Volume 48, Number 6, ISSN 0012-1649

Abstract

Two independent studies were conducted to extend previous research by examining the associations between task value priority patterns across school subjects and aspirations toward the physical and information technology- (IT-) related sciences. Study 1 measured task values of a sample of 10th graders in the United States (N = 249) across (a) physics and chemistry, (b) math, and (c) English. Study 2 measured task values of a sample of students in the second year of high school in Finland (N = 351) across (a) math and science, (b) Finnish, and (c) the arts and physical education. In both studies, students were classified into groups according to how they ranked math and science in relation to the other subjects. Regression analyses indicated that task value group membership significantly predicted subsequent aspirations toward physical and IT-related sciences measured 1-2 years later. The task value groups who placed the highest priority on math and science were significantly more likely to aspire to physical and IT-related sciences than were the other groups. These findings provide support for the theoretical assumption regarding the predictive role of intraindividual hierarchical patterns of task values for subsequent preferences and choices suggested by the Eccles [Parsons] (1983) expectancy-value model. (Contains 11 tables and 2 figures.)

Citation

Chow, A., Eccles, J.S. & Salmela-Aro, K. (2012). Task Value Profiles across Subjects and Aspirations to Physical and IT-Related Sciences in the United States and Finland. Developmental Psychology, 48(6), 1612-1628. Retrieved January 17, 2020 from .

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