You are here:

Participation and Critical Thinking in Online University Distance Education
ARTICLE

JDE Volume 13, Number 2, ISSN 0830-0445 Publisher: Athabasca University Press

Abstract

Results of this case study of a university-level course delivered by computer conferencing suggest that the emergence of a dynamic and interactive educational process that facilitates critical thinking is contingent on appropriate course design, instructor interventions, content, and students' characteristics. (AEF)

Citation

Bullen, M. (1998). Participation and Critical Thinking in Online University Distance Education. The Journal of Distance Education / Revue de l'ducation Distance, 13(2), 1-32. Athabasca University Press. Retrieved April 24, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ERIC on April 18, 2013. [Original Record]

ERIC is sponsored by the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) of the U.S. Department of Education.

Copyright for this record is held by the content creator. For more details see ERIC's copyright policy.

Keywords

View References & Citations Map

Cited By

  1. Adoption of Open Educational Resources in Taiwan

    Benjamin Bing-Yuh Lu & Hsiao-Ping Yeh, Tungnan University, Taiwan

    Asian Journal of Distance Education Vol. 10, No. 1 () pp. 16–27

  2. Using Activity Theory to Design Constructivist Online Learning Environments for Higher Order Thinking: A Retrospective Analysis

    Dirk Morrison & Dirk Morrison

    Canadian Journal of Learning and Technology / La revue canadienne de l’apprentissage et de la technologie Vol. 29, No. 3 (Oct 15, 2003)

  3. A Review of e-Learning in Canada: Rejoinder to Commentaries

    Philip Abrami, Robert Bernard, Anne Wade, Eugene Borokhovski, Rana Tamin, Michael Surkes, Dai Zhang & Dai Zhang

    Canadian Journal of Learning and Technology / La revue canadienne de l’apprentissage et de la technologie Vol. 32, No. 3 (Oct 15, 2006)

  4. Online Learner Satisfaction: Learner-Instructor Discourse

    Peter Kiriakidis, 1387909 ONTARIO INC, Canada

    TCC 2007 (2007) pp. 147–158

  5. Assessing Online Dialogue in Higher Education

    Eva Bures, Bishop's University, Canada; Philip Abrami, Concordia University, Canada; Alexandra Barclay, Mount St. Vincent University, Canada; Eva Bures, Bishop's University, Canada

    E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2010 (Oct 18, 2010) pp. 438–448

  6. Critical Thinking in Asynchronous Online Discussions: Examining the Role of the Student Facilitator

    Khe Foon Hew, Wing Sum Cheung & Siti Nurbaya Jumain, National Institute of Education, Singapore

    Global Learn 2010 (May 17, 2010) pp. 4210–4215

  7. Student Participation Patterns in Online Discussion: Incorporating Constructivist Discussion into Online Courses

    Hoe Kyeung Kim & Betzi Bateman, Cleveland State University, United States

    International Journal on E-Learning Vol. 9, No. 1 (January 2010) pp. 79–98

  8. Detecting Critical Thinking in Synchronous Online Discussions: The Potential Role for Instant Messaging in Higher Education

    Susan Olubunmi & Janet McCracken, Simon Fraser University, Canada

    E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2008 (Nov 17, 2008) pp. 3078–3086

  9. The Extent of Learner and Instructor Discourse Varies with Respect to Students’ Academic Levels

    Peter Kiriakidis & Panayot Gueorguiev, Swiss Management Center, Canada

    E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2007 (Oct 15, 2007) pp. 6154–6161

  10. Student characteristics and participation patterns in online discussion

    Hoe Kyeung Kim & Betzi Bateman, Cleveland State University, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2007 (Mar 26, 2007) pp. 2381–2387

  11. An Analysis of Student Practices in Asynchronous Computer Conferencing Environments

    Vanessa Peters & Jim Hewitt, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto (OISE/UT), Canada

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2005 (Jun 27, 2005) pp. 778–785

  12. Student Motivation and Social Presence in Online Learning: Implications for Future Research

    Hua Bai, Purdue University, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2003 (2003) pp. 2714–2720

  13. Traditions to Transformations: The Forced Evolution of Higher Education

    Patricia L. Rogers, Bemidji State University, United States

    AACE Journal Vol. 9, No. 1 (2001) pp. 47–60

  14. Exploring Social Communication in Computer Conferencing

    Liam Rourke & Terry Anderson, University of Alberta, Canada

    Journal of Interactive Learning Research Vol. 13, No. 3 (2002) pp. 259–275

  15. Qualitative Methods in Evaluating the Quality of Online Learning

    Veronica Hendriks, United Nations University/Institute of Advanced Studies, Japan; Dorit Maor, School of Education, Murdoch University, Australia

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2003 (2003) pp. 2586–2593

  16. The Effects of Instructor Presence on Critical Thinking in Asynchronous Online Discussion

    Chaohua Ou, Trudy LeDoux & Steven Crooks, College of Education, Texas Technology University, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2004 (2004) pp. 2989–2993

  17. Comparing Communication Content and Reporting of Personal Experiences in Asynchronous Discussion Boards (On-Line vs. Traditional Undergraduates)

    Diane Wagoner, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, United States; Kay Wijekumar, The Pennsylvania State University, United States

    E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2003 (2003) pp. 1806–1808

  18. The Relationship between Online Teacher Immediacy Behaviors and Online Instructional Effectiveness

    Hee-Young Kim, University of Houston, United States

    E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2004 (2004) pp. 1954–1959

These links are based on references which have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake, please contact info@learntechlib.org.