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Servant, Master, Double-Edged Sword: Metaphors Teachers Use to Discuss Technology
Article

, , University of Portland, United States

Journal of Technology and Teacher Education Volume 10, Number 2, ISSN 1059-7069 Publisher: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education, Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

Although technology and technology access are far from equitably distributed in our societies, technology is progressively pervasive. There is a baseline of technology integration with which the vast majority of our citizens must deal—telephones and video players, upc scanners and computerized automobile accessories, bank transactions and online merchandise ordering to name but a few. Whether a baseline of technology integration exists in educational environments is more problematic. Communities, teachers, teacher educators, and educational researchers are continuing a 30-year-old debate (Nichols & Allen-Brown, 1996) about not only to what extent applications of technology should be integrated into schools but whether technology belongs in the curriculum at all. Admittedly the substance and tenor of this debate has changed substantially over its lifetime.

The present concern is focused on the influence that teachers display over the degree to which technology and technology-related issues and activities are integrated into curriculum. And more specifically, to look at how the language that teachers use to describe technology influences the choices they make in this area.

Citation

Carroll, J.B. & Eifler, K.E. (2002). Servant, Master, Double-Edged Sword: Metaphors Teachers Use to Discuss Technology. Journal of Technology and Teacher Education, 10(2), 235-246. Norfolk, VA: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education. Retrieved April 19, 2019 from .

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Cited By

  1. Teachers' Ambiguous Views of Technology

    Rong-Ji Chen, California State University San Marcos, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2009 (Mar 02, 2009) pp. 4036–4041

These links are based on references which have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake, please contact info@learntechlib.org.