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Redesigning a Course Using an Analysis of Technical Problems Encountered in an Online Technology Training Course
PROCEEDINGS

, , , University of Idaho, United States

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Montreal, Canada ISBN 978-1-880094-46-4 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), San Diego, CA

Abstract

When designing web-based courses, a challenge arises to prevent and overcome technical problems encountered by the students and then to make adjustments in the course design for future students. While many of these technical problems can be prevented before the course is offered, many technical issues are not apparent until the course is in session. This study sought to analyze the technical problems encountered by students in a technology training course for educators. The results of the study then informed the redesign of the course for its next offering. The study collected data by both qualitative and quantitative means with the overall purpose of determining in which course modules the students encountered the most technical problems. Further data collected from the survey following the course indicated that occurrence of technical problems did not negatively impact the students' rating of the value of each module or the perceptions of the value of the course.

Citation

Klett, M., Graves, S. & Abbitt, J. (2002). Redesigning a Course Using an Analysis of Technical Problems Encountered in an Online Technology Training Course. In M. Driscoll & T. Reeves (Eds.), Proceedings of E-Learn 2002--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 53-60). Montreal, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved February 19, 2019 from .

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