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The Use of Audio in Computer-Based Instruction
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Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology [AECT],

Abstract

This study investigated the effects of audio and text density on the achievement, time-in-program, and attitudes of 134 undergraduates. Data concerning the subjects' preexisting computer skills and experience, as well as demographic information, were also collected. The instruction in visual design principles was delivered by computer and included numerous illustrations. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of three presentation versions of the instruction: text only, full text-full audio, or lean text-full audio. No significant difference in achievement was found for the three treatment groups; however, significant differences in achievement were found for sex (females achieving more than males) and self-ratings of computer skill (subjects with higher self-ratings achieving more than those with lower self-ratings). While overall attitudes toward the instruction were favorable, subjects in the full text-full audio treatment responded less favorably than their counterparts in the other treatments. (Author/MES)

Citation

Koroghlanian, C.M. & Sullivan, H.J. (1999). The Use of Audio in Computer-Based Instruction. Presented at Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology [AECT] 1999. Retrieved February 18, 2020 from .

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