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Analysis-Based Message Design: Rethinking Screen Design Guidelines
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Selected Research and Development Presentations at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) Sponsored by the Research and Theory Division,

Abstract

This article describes the evolution of computer interface research issues from text-based interface design guidelines to more complex issues, including media selection, interface design, and visual design. This research is then integrated into the Analysis-based Message Design (AMD) process. The AMD process divides the interface design process into four action steps: (1) identify conditions--analyzing the environmental, learner, or instructional needs which define or create boundaries for the instructional product; (2) select design features--using instructional and learning theories, media selections research, and personal experience to support design feature selection; (3) resolve conflicts--giving special consideration to features which are desirable with regard to one or more conditions and undesirable with regard to another condition; and (4) create the design layout--using the ABC's R US design principles (alignment, balance, contrast, chunking, repetition, utility, and simplicity). Explanations and graphic examples of these principles are provided. (DLS)

Citation

Beriswill, J.E. (1998). Analysis-Based Message Design: Rethinking Screen Design Guidelines. Presented at Selected Research and Development Presentations at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) Sponsored by the Research and Theory Division 1998. Retrieved November 18, 2019 from .

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