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How Do Local School Districts Formulate Educational Technology Policy?
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Selected Research and Development Presentations at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) Sponsored by the Research and Theory Division,

Abstract

This study reports on the formulation of educational technology policy in three Illinois K-12 school districts (n=36). Major findings included: (1) educational policy formulation in the districts focused on collecting the objects of technology, such as computers, modems, networks, rather than viewing educational technology as a systematic process of achieving goals; (2) active leadership from a superintendent was essential in each school district; (3) formulation of the plans was more than an empowered committee or executive blessing--it required active participation by a superintendent. Findings also revealed that some of the school districts' planning ideas had omissions, such as detailed plans for staff development, finances, evaluation, and school culture issues. The flow of a technology initiative starts with a vision and includes technology goals, development of instruction, implementation, evaluation, and recycling/revision. Using this systems approach and adding the omissions observed in the research, a planning template, the "Technology Planning Web," was developed to be used at the goal and development steps of the technology initiative. At the center of the web are educational technology goals and learning activities; other components include evaluation protocol, staff development, hardware, finances, research and development, physical infrastructure, and political/cultural infrastructure. (Contains 33 references.) (AEF)

Citation

Hunt, J.L. & Lockard, J. (1998). How Do Local School Districts Formulate Educational Technology Policy?. Presented at Selected Research and Development Presentations at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) Sponsored by the Research and Theory Division 1998. Retrieved November 17, 2019 from .

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