You are here:

Virtual Kids of the 21 st Century: Understanding the Children in Schools Today
Article

, , RMIT University, Bundoora West Campus, Australia

ITCE Volume 2001, Number 1, ISSN 1522-8185 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE)

Abstract

This article reports on a study which interviewed 934 chil-dren ranging from 10 to 13 years of age about their owner-ship, use, and views of computer and video games. Computer games are viewed as an important part of the lives of children and we need to understand their impact and relevance to the children who inhabit our classrooms. The results of the study both confirmed existing data which indicated major gender differences in ownership, use, and preferences and highlight-ed that students enjoy playing computer and video games and that they also enjoy a range of other activities as well as games. The results have important implications for those who design curriculum and learning opportunities in schools. In home contexts children now use information and communi-cation technologies extensively. If education systems contin-ue to ignore the potential of ICT for learning experiences they are in danger of being regarded as Neolithic by those who experience them and this should be a grave source of concern to those who are responsible for educating the next generation for the information age.

Citation

Yelland, N. & Lloyd, M. (2001). Virtual Kids of the 21 st Century: Understanding the Children in Schools Today. Information Technology in Childhood Education Annual, 2001(1), 175-192. Norfolk, VA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved August 25, 2019 from .

Keywords

References

View References & Citations Map

These references have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. Signed in users can suggest corrections to these mistakes.

Suggest Corrections to References

Cited By

View References & Citations Map
  • How Low-Income Children Use the Internet at Home

    Linda Jackson, Alexander von Eye, Frank Biocca, Gretchen Barbatsis, Yong Zhao & Hiram Fitzgerald, Michigan State University, United States

    Journal of Interactive Learning Research Vol. 16, No. 3 (July 2005) pp. 259–271

These links are based on references which have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake, please contact info@learntechlib.org.