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Science Students Surf the Web: Effects on Constructivist Classroom Environments
Article

, , Curtin University of Technology

JCMST Volume 20, Number 2, ISSN 0731-9258 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

A classical dilemma faces any secondary science teacher: to teach to a standardised exam at the expense of student inter-est and exploration or to allow for individual discovery and creativity knowing full well that university entrance exam scores may suffer in the interim. When one considers that the half-life of a college graduate engineer is now estimated to be four years, the age of life-long learning certainly has ar-rived (Davis, 1996). Thus, the foremost role of a teacher to-day should be to teach students how to learn. In that regard, there has probably never been a piece of technology more fit-tingly applicable to this constructivist philosophy of educa-tion. Early on teachers learn that the effectiveness of web browser tools such as Mosaic, Internet Explorer, or Netscape must by necessity be built on constructivist orientations to teaching and learning (Collier & Le Baron, 1995). More and more, the responsibility for learning shifts to the learner who turns to technology for content, freeing the teacher to focus on the process of learning and interpersonal relationships (Davis & Botkin, 1994). This explosion of technology re-quires that students become active learners, that classroom teachers become co-learners (Loader, 1991). This study looked at the impact of a particular piece of technology that has exploded on the secondary school scene in the short span during the 1990s, the Internet used with both e-mail and World Wide Web (WWW or Web) browser software. In par-ticular, the extent and nature of Internet usage and its impact on the constructivist learning environment was investigated.

Citation

FISHER, D. & CHURACH, D. (2001). Science Students Surf the Web: Effects on Constructivist Classroom Environments. Journal of Computers in Mathematics and Science Teaching, 20(2), 221-247. Norfolk, VA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved December 6, 2020 from .

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