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The Effectiveness of Interactive Distance Education Technologies in K-12 Learning: A Meta-Analysis
Article

, University of North Florida, United States

IJET Volume 7, Number 1, ISSN 1077-9124 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

This article summarizes a quantitative synthesis of studies of the effectiveness of interactive distance education using vid-eoconferencing and telecommunications for K-12 academic achievement. Effect sizes for 19 experimental and quasi-ex-perimental studies including 929 student participants were analyzed across sample characteristics, study methods, learn-ing environment, learner attributes, and technological char-acteristics. The overall mean effect size was 0.147, a small positive effect in favor of distance education. Effect sizes were more positive for interactive distance education pro-grams that combine an individualized approach with tradi-tional classroom instruction. Programs including instruction delivered through telecommunications, enhancement of classroom learning, short duration, and small groups yielded larger effect sizes than programs using videoconferencing, primary instruction through distance, long duration, and large groups. Studies of distance education for all academic content areas except foreign language resulted in positive ef-fect sizes. This synthesis supports the use of interactive dis-tance education to complement, enhance, and expand educa-tion options because distance education can be expected to result in achievement at least comparable to traditional in-struction in most academic circumstances.

Citation

Cavanaugh, C.S. (2001). The Effectiveness of Interactive Distance Education Technologies in K-12 Learning: A Meta-Analysis. International Journal of Educational Telecommunications, 7(1), 73-88. Norfolk, VA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved May 20, 2019 from .

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