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If it ain't broke, why fix it?: Disruptive and constructive computer-mediated response group practices
ARTICLE

Computers and Composition Volume 13, Number 3, ISSN 8755-4615 Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

This article addresses the disruption that frequently follows the insertion of computers into non-computer-mediated practices. After arguing that peer response should be a central activity in writing classes, the essay describes several traditional and computer-mediated peer-response strategies. The disruption of moving from traditional to computer-mediated peer response is dramatized by the author's initial experiences. The article then analyzes what is gained and lost when students move from traditional to computer-mediated peer-response groups. The essay ends with an acknowledgment that computer-mediated peer-response groups are as inevitable as computer-mediated instruction, but they need to be used with caution and blended with traditional practices. Their use and the potential for disruption is a reminder that teachers need to ask careful questions about whether and how technology should merge with rather than supplant previously useful practices.

Citation

Peckham, I. (1996). If it ain't broke, why fix it?: Disruptive and constructive computer-mediated response group practices. Computers and Composition, 13(3), 327-339. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved July 22, 2019 from .

This record was imported from Computers and Composition on January 29, 2019. Computers and Composition is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S8755-4615(96)90021-3

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