You are here:

Motivation and Teachers' Computer Use
PROCEEDINGS

Selected Research and Development Presentations at the 1996 National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology,

Abstract

Despite increased availability and support for computers, relatively few teachers have integrated them into their teaching. This paper summarizes four studies that studies were conducted, two with independent groups of practicing teachers and two conducted longitudinally with a single group, first when they were preservice undergraduate teachers, and then later after they had taught professionally for a year. One purpose of these studies was to identify levels of computer use among practicing teachers and any change from expected to actual levels of use among the preservice-to-novice group. Another purpose was to identify variables of internal motivation as predictors of teachers' computer use. Levels of computer use among teachers were not high. Preservice educators' expectations of computer use were very high but dropped after one year of professional teaching. Perceived relevance of and self-competence in computer use were strong predictors; however, when "Subjective Norms" was included in the calculation, it emerged as the predictor which superseded all others. In order for teachers to adopt computers, there needs to be a perception generated by the professional environment that computer integration is expected. This can be established by modeling use by administrators, colleagues, students, and the profession. A work environment would be equipped and faculty training and support would be available. (Contains 27 references.) (Author/SWC)

Citation

Marcinkiewicz, H.R. (1996). Motivation and Teachers' Computer Use. Presented at Selected Research and Development Presentations at the 1996 National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology 1996. Retrieved November 21, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ERIC on April 18, 2013. [Original Record]

ERIC is sponsored by the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) of the U.S. Department of Education.

Copyright for this record is held by the content creator. For more details see ERIC's copyright policy.

Keywords

Cited By

View References & Citations Map

These links are based on references which have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake, please contact info@learntechlib.org.