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Do Digital Divisions Still Persist in Schools? Access to Technology and Technical Skills of Teachers in High Needs Schools in the United States of America
ARTICLE

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JEFTIRP Volume 36, Number 2, ISSN 0260-7476

Abstract

Technology use in schools has great potential to improve student learning outcomes. However, it is imperative that teachers possess a set of technical skills required to implement high-quality technologies in the classroom. Research conducted during the late 1990s and the early 2000s had pointed to the existence of a digital divide that existed in schools within the United States of America (USA), with higher-needs schools typically having less access to technology than their lower needs counterparts. The purpose of this paper is to examine whether there is any indication of current differences in technology access, skills and classroom integration practices as reported by teachers participating in an online professional development initiative. The researchers found that, while significant differences existed between teachers in high need and non-high need schools in the USA, context is a vital component of considering any persisting digital divides. (Contains 5 tables and 1 figure.)

Citation

Chapman, L., Masters, J. & Pedulla, J. (2010). Do Digital Divisions Still Persist in Schools? Access to Technology and Technical Skills of Teachers in High Needs Schools in the United States of America. Journal of Education for Teaching: International Research and Pedagogy, 36(2), 239-249. Retrieved December 8, 2019 from .

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