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Usability of a Runtime Environment for the Use of IMS Learning Design in Mixed Mode Higher Education
ARTICLE

Journal of Educational Technology & Society Volume 9, Number 1, ISSN 1176-3647 e-ISSN 1176-3647

Abstract

Starting from the first public draft of IMS Learning Design in November 2002, a research project at the Catholic University Eichstaett-Ingolstadt in Germany was dedicated to the conceptual examination and empirical review of IMS Learning Design Level A. A prototypical runtime environment called "lab005" was developed. It was built based on Moodle, a web-based, open source course management system. Development and use of the lab005 runtime environment were intensely evaluated. Several university courses provided a use case for the empirical review of IMS Learning Design, which covered mainly two issues: firstly, whether IMS Learning Design can be used to support mixed mode learning scenarios (use for blended learning), and secondly, how users interact in learning situations with a learning environment for IMS Learning Design (usability in terms of human-computer interaction). This article gives an overview of the web-based learning environment lab005, its underlying concepts and outcomes of experimental use and evaluation. Though limited in scope, the successful implementation of IMS Learning Design in higher education proves the possibility to support mixed mode learning scenarios. Key concepts for the graphical user interface of lab005 are illustrated in order to give insights into the use of IMS Learning Design in mixed mode learning scenarios. Details in the results of evaluation concern the classification of learning objects, the use of environment as an element in IMS Learning Design and challenges in the application with face-to-face situations and with real life objects in classroom learning scenarios. (Contains 3 figures.)

Citation

Klebl, M. (2006). Usability of a Runtime Environment for the Use of IMS Learning Design in Mixed Mode Higher Education. Journal of Educational Technology & Society, 9(1), 146-157. Retrieved June 26, 2019 from .

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