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Towards a Framework for Attention Cueing in Instructional Animations: Guidelines for Research and Design
ARTICLE

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Educational Psychology Review Volume 21, Number 2, ISSN 1040-726X

Abstract

This paper examines the transferability of successful cueing approaches from text and static visualization research to animations. Theories of visual attention and learning as well as empirical evidence for the instructional effectiveness of attention cueing are reviewed and, based on Mayer's theory of multimedia learning, a framework was developed for classifying three functions for cueing: (1) selection–cues guide attention to specific locations, (2) organization–cues emphasize structure, and (3) integration–cues explicate relations between and within elements. The framework was used to structure the discussion of studies on cueing in animations. It is concluded that attentional cues may facilitate the selection of information in animations and sometimes improve learning, whereas organizational and relational cueing requires more consideration on how to enhance understanding. Consequently, it is suggested to develop cues that work in animations rather than borrowing effective cues from static representations. Guidelines for future research on attention cueing in animations are presented.

Citation

de Koning, B.B., Tabbers, H.K., Rikers, R.M.J.P. & Paas, F. (2009). Towards a Framework for Attention Cueing in Instructional Animations: Guidelines for Research and Design. Educational Psychology Review, 21(2), 113-140. Retrieved April 21, 2019 from .

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