You are here:

Making Space for Informal Inquiry: Inquiry as Stance in an Online Induction Network
ARTICLE

Journal of Teacher Education Volume 63, Number 2, ISSN 0022-4871

Abstract

This study brings the concept of inquiry as stance to bear on current understandings of how inquiry occurs within online networks for teacher induction. The author presents a case study of an online network that allowed 36 new teachers to participate in informal, spontaneous conversations. Genre research is used to examine the on-network, off-network relationship of teachers' inquiry activity. Using integrated analysis of the online messages and of interviews that focused on teachers' contexts and actions, the author presents a holistic portrait of teachers' participation in informal inquiries. The online discussions allowed novice teachers to collaboratively consider new possibilities and to individually develop and reconsider their frameworks for teaching secondary English. Inquiry mentors and researchers should recognize and make space for inquiry as stance by attending to ties between new teachers' on- and off-list activities–to how teachers enact inquiry as stance within and beyond online spaces. (Contains 4 figures and 1 table.)

Citation

Zuidema, L.A. (2012). Making Space for Informal Inquiry: Inquiry as Stance in an Online Induction Network. Journal of Teacher Education, 63(2), 132-146. Retrieved February 23, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ERIC on April 19, 2013. [Original Record]

ERIC is sponsored by the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) of the U.S. Department of Education.

Copyright for this record is held by the content creator. For more details see ERIC's copyright policy.

Keywords

View References & Citations Map

Cited By

  1. New Teacher Academies: Building Digital Teacher Induction through Blogs and Social Media

    Amanda Hurlbut, Sarah McMahan, Rebecca Fredrickson & Karen Dunlap, Texas Woman's University, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2018 (Mar 26, 2018) pp. 2274–2279

  2. PK-12 Teachers’ Conceptualizations of Professional Learning Networks

    Jeffrey Carpenter, Elon University, United States; Daniel Krutka, Texas Woman's University, United States; Torrey Trust, University of Massachusetts Amherst, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2016 (Mar 21, 2016) pp. 1936–1942

  3. Digital Teacher Induction via Webinars and Social Media

    Peggy Semingson, Denise Collins, Holly Hungerford-Kresser, Amanda Hurlbut, Joyce Myers, Dana Owens & Marla Robertson, The University of Texas at Arlington, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2016 (Mar 21, 2016) pp. 367–372

  4. Teacher to Teacher: An Investigation into Teacher-Generated Online Professional Development

    Luke Rodesiler, Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2016 (Mar 21, 2016) pp. 49–54

These links are based on references which have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake, please contact info@learntechlib.org.