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Limits of PowerPoint’s Power: Enhancing students’ self-efficacy and attitudes but not their behavior
ARTICLE

Computers & Education Volume 50, Number 4, ISSN 0360-1315 Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

The effects of accompanying lectures with computer-mediated PowerPoint presentations or PowerPoint generated overheads on students’ self-efficacy, attitudes, course performance, and class-related behaviors were examined. Two Introduction to Developmental Psychology sections were initially taught with lectures accompanied by either overheads or computer-mediated presentations. The teaching format was switched halfway through the semester. Students reported higher self-efficacy and more positive attitudes toward the class with computer-mediated presentations. They also claimed that the website was more interesting and useful under these teaching conditions, indicating a halo effect of the computer-mediated presentations. However, the teaching format did not appear to affect course-related behavior, such as performance on exams, class attendance, participation in class discussions, or course website usage.

Citation

Susskind, J.E. (2008). Limits of PowerPoint’s Power: Enhancing students’ self-efficacy and attitudes but not their behavior. Computers & Education, 50(4), 1228-1239. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved September 21, 2019 from .

This record was imported from Computers & Education on April 18, 2013. Computers & Education is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/detail?accno=EJ790920

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